What is the gender pay gap?

We are required by law to publish our gender pay gap figures each year. This requirement comes from the Equality Act 2010.

The gender pay gap is a measure of difference between men and women’s average earnings across an organisation. It is expressed as a percentage of men’s earnings. These figures take into consideration both part-time and full-time employees.

Having a gender pay gap does not mean we have inequalities of pay between males and females who are doing the same work.

Gender pay gap reporting can help us assess the proportion of men and women at all levels of seniority within an organisation. Our figures, as split for officers and staff, reflect that we may need to take different action to improve the gap for officers compared with staff, such as, work to increase the numbers of females progressing to senior officer roles. We separate staff and officer payment here so it is easier to see where we need to focus our efforts to close the gaps.

The median pay gap figure is the one most often used as this is the one most representative of the experience of the average worker within the organisation. It is not affected by extreme values, such as the changes in earnings of small numbers of very high earners.

The mean pay gap figure, along with the quartile information, can be more useful to show pay gaps occurring because of the spread of representation of males and females in higher paid roles. These figures can help us focus our efforts to close the gaps.

Our Results

The report shows the overall gender pay gap figures of the following:

  • Gender pay gap (mean and median)
  • Gender bonus gap (mean and median)
  • Proportion of men and women in each quartile of the organisation’s pay structure
  • Proportion of men and women receiving bonuses.

 

Glossary of Terms

Gender pay gap

A comparison between mean and median hourly pay for all women and men within the force. Both full time and part time employees.

Median gender pay gap

This is the difference between the median (middle) value of hourly pay rates (when ordered from lowest to highest) for all men in an organisation, and the median value of hourly pay rates for all women, expressed as a percentage of the median hourly rate for men.

Mean gender pay gap

This is the difference between the mean (average) hourly pay rate for all men in an organisation, and the mean hourly pay rate for all women, expressed as a percentage of the mean hourly rate for men.

Median bonus pay gap

This is the difference between the median (middle) value of bonuses (when ordered from lowest to highest) for all men in an organisation and the median value of bonuses for all women, as a percentage of the median bonus for men.

Mean bonus pay gap

This is the difference between the mean (average) value of bonuses for all men in an organisation and the mean value of bonuses for all women, expressed as a percentage of the mean bonus for men.

25% (quartile) pay distribution 

The proportion of men and women in each 25% (quartile) of an employer’s pay structure.

Bonuses

Part of the reason it is important to separate officers from staff when studying the gender pay gap is because of the different ways they get paid. There are more bonuses available to officers, including the unsociable hours bonus and those given to specialist roles. Staff are more likely to work regular office hours, resulting in less bonuses and also less gap between them. Like other forces, particularly those making firearms payments, our figures show a bonus pay gap which can be attributed to the low number of females currently in firearms.

The figures are based on a data snapshot taken at 31 March 2018.  Last year’s report is accessible here.